Creating a structured settlement for an injury victim involves give and take on both sides.

Unfortunately, there is almost always an adversarial element to the discussions that can, at its worst, lead to unnecessary conflict. Some say it is all part of the practice of law, but is it always best for the client?

An article written by Long Beach attorney John P. Blumberg in the June issue of Plaintiff magazine, “Avoiding Discovery Wars,” provides a strong case that trying to one-up the opposition in deposition wastes time and does nothing to further the client’s interests.

Blumberg prefers an Aikido martial arts approach–using harmony, agreement and energy to find a suitable path to resolution over toe-to-toe, in-your-face strategies so often found in discovery and trial. It’s a good lesson–both for litigation and for life.

Read the full article here.

– Patrick C. Farber

Photo Credit: Here

 

Creating a structured settlement for an injury victim involves give and take on both sides. Unfortunately, there is almost always an adversarial element to the discussions that can, at its worst, lead to unnecessary conflict. Some say it is all part of the practice of law, but is it always best for the client? An article written by Long Beach attorney John P. Blumberg in the June issue of Plaintiff magazine, “Avoiding Discovery Wars,” provides a strong case that trying to one-up the opposition in deposition wastes time and does nothing to further the client’s interests. Blumberg prefers an Aikido martial arts approach–using harmony, agreement and energy to find a suitable path to resolution over toe-to-toe, in-your-face strategies so often found in discovery and trial. It’s a good lesson–both for litigation and for life. To read the article, go to: http://plaintiffmagazine.com/Jun11/Blumberg_Avoiding-discovery-wars_Plaintiff-magazine.pdf.

 

 

 

 

 

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